The relationship between Bloom and Stephen : a study of James Joyce's Ulysses

全文

(1)

The relationship between Bloom and Stephen : a study of James Joyce's Ulysses

著者(英) Yuko Yoshimura

journal or

publication title

Core

number 8

page range 87‑108

year 1979‑03‑31

URL http://doi.org/10.14988/pa.2017.0000016390

(2)

87 

The R e l a t i o n s h i p  b e t w e e n  Bloom a n d  S t e p h e n :   A S t u d y  o f   J a m e s  J o y c e ' s   U l y s s e s  

Yuko Y  o s h i m u r a  

There is  a fundamental difference in  the description of  characters  between A Portrait 01 the Artist as a Young Man and Ulysses.  In A  Portrait the protagonist is  obviously Stephen Dedalus

, 

and  there  is  no scene where he does not appear.  The technique of  the stream of  consciousness reveals  the inner五gureof Stephen.  What readers get  is  Stephen's consciousness and thought.  ]. 1.  M. Stewart says as fol‑ lows: 

Here

, 

as  later  in parts of Ulysses

, 

we are  lockedp hrmly  inside Stephen's head; and there are times when we feel like  shouting to be let  out.  What Stephen takes  for  granted

, 

we  have to  take for  granted too. . . .1 

Readers understand fully what Stephen feels  and  thinks  as  if  they  themselves were Stephen.  In this  way

, 

it  is  only Stephen that is  il‑ luminated.  The other characters are conhned in the dark and are not  allowed to exist apart from Stephen.  They can exist only when they  are perceived by Stephen.  In other words

, 

they must reconcile  them‑

selves to  the servile position as the means by which the mental struc‑ ture and the development of Stephen are depicted.  Some characters  such as Cranly and Lynch have a signi五cantargument with Stephen

, 

(3)

88  The Relationship btweenBloom and Stephen 

but there is  little  scope  left  them for  further  activities  than  only  listening to  what Stephen speaks.  As soon as  Stephen  falls  in  his  own thought

, 

the existences of other characters vanish into the void.  How the others around Stephen live  is  not a great matter of concern  for A Portrait

, 

much less  how they see Stephen. 

On the other hand

, 

in Ulysses there is  not so evid ta protagonist  as  Stephen in A Portrait.  The existence of any character is  not pe

vasive; he does not always appear throughout the whole volume.  That  is  to say

, 

each character does not exist for and by other special  char‑ acters and he has his  own independent individuality. A. Cronin says

, 

In Ulysses

, 

for  the五rst time in fiction

, 

life  could be almost  completely itself.  Where in the novel of event each picture

, 

each person

, 

each happening

, 

each thought has  to  be  subor‑ dinated to  the over‑all  pattern

, 

in Ulysses  they  are  allowed  their own importance2

Fathet Conmee

, 

Master Patrick Dignam

, 

Miss Kennedy of the Ormond  bar

, 

Canstable 57C

, 

Almidano Artifoni‑even such characters are not  subordinate to  any special character.  1n Ulysses  one  human society  is  described centrifugally by arranging every minute character with‑ in its  spatial  framework

, 

while only one person is  described centrip

etally in A Portrait as  its  title shows.  The characters of Ulysses are  seen simultaneously.  1t  is  true that  some episodes  are  contributed  to  some speci五ccharacters: the first  three episodes to  Stephen

, 

the  second three episodes  to Bloom

, 

and the last  episode to Molly.  How‑

ever

, 

taken all  together

, 

the characters of Ulysses are watched on the  same plane.  1t  should be remarked  that  there  is  described  mutuaI 

(4)

The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen  89  relation between characters  in Ulysses.  Therefore

, 

readers can exam‑

ine each character many‑sidedly: they can analyze one character not  only through the stream of his consciousness but also through other  characters' view on him.  Readers can see every character in the re lationship with other characters. 

The aim of this  article  is  to study how Leopold Bloom and Stephen  Dedalus live  respectively and how they are related to each other. 

The rlationshipbetween Bloom and Stephen is  worthy of attntion. According to  the Homeric paral1els3, Bloom corresponds to  Odysseus  and Stphento  Telemachus : Bloom and Stephen must be a father and  his  son.  Howevertheschema is  quite problematic.  In fact

, 

the  re‑ lationship between Bloom and Stephen hs been  discussed  by many  critics  in  many ways4. 

Simon Dedalus is  Stephen's father by blood

, 

but can no longer grasp  his own son.  In the carriage to the funeral

, 

it  is  not Simon but Bloom  that catches  sight of Stephen: 

Mr Bloom at  gaze saw a lithe young man

, 

clad  in  mourning

, 

a wide hat. 

‑There's a friend of yours gone by

, 

Dedalus

, 

h said.

‑Who is  that? 

‑Your son and heir. 

‑Where is  he? Mr Dedalus said, stretching over across'.  Simon cannot see Stephen.  In the Ormond bar

, 

Lenehan says to Simon : 

‑Greetings from the famous son of a famous father. 

(5)

90  The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen 

‑Who may he be?  Mr Dedalus asked.  Lenehan opened most genial arms.  Who? 

‑Who may he be? he asked.  Can you ask?  Stephen

, 

the  youthful bard. 

Dry. 

Mr Dedalus

, 

famous fighter

, 

laid by his dry五lledpipe. 

‑1 see

, 

he said.  1 didn't  recognize him for  the  moment. 

1 hear he is  keeping very select company.  Have you seen him  lately?  (pp. 337‑338) 

Simon is  not aItogether indifferent to  Stephen:  he is  concerned  for  Stephen who keeps company with what Simon calls a  lowdown crowd" 

(p.  110)  such as M uIligan.  However

, 

Simon cannot understand  what  Stephen really thinks. 

Besides

, 

Stephen himself has felt estranged from Simon since a long  while ago.  He knows that Simon is  a quite warmhearted man

, 

but he  五ndsin  Simon nothing  congenial  to  himself.  Stephen  recoIlects  in  the Library: 

Hurrying to her squalid deathlair  from gay Paris  on  the  quayside 1 touched his  hand.  The voice

, 

new warmth

, 

speak

‑ing.  Dr Bob Kenny is  attending  her.  The eyes  that  wish  me welI.  But do not know me.  (p.  265) 

1n the cabman's shelter

, 

Stephen wilI not dec1are himself the  son  of  Simon Dedalus: 

‑You know Simon Dedalus?  he [the unknown sailorJ ask‑ ed at  length. 

‑I've heard of him

, 

Stephen said. 

(6)

The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen 

Mr Bloom was al1 at  sea for  a moment

, 

seeing  the  others  evidently eavesdropping too. 

‑He's Irish

, 

the seaman bold armed

staring sti1l in much  the same way and nodding.  All Irish. 

‑All too Irish

, 

Stephen rejoined.  (p.  718) 

91 

The father‑son relationship between Simon and Stephen is  completely  broken.  Simon Dedalus who is  too lrish cannot be the father of Ste‑ phen who detests Ireland so  much.  Stephen does not have the father  to  follow 

In place of Simon Dedalus

, 

Bloom appears as Stephen's prospective  father.  M u11igan says to Stephen in the Library : He (BloomJ knows  you.  He knows your old fellow.  0

, 

1 fear  me

, 

he is  Greeker  than  the Greeks."  (p.  257)  Bloom is  said  to  know Stephen

, 

while  Simon  Dedalus does  not  know Stephen.  Readers  know that  what  Stephen  talks of Shakespeare in this Library is  app1icable to Bloom.  For ex‑ ample

, 

Stephen says about Shakespeare: All in al l. In Cymbeline

, 

in  Othello he is  bawd and cuckold."  (p.  272)  Bloom is  a  cultured  al1‑ roundman" (p. 301)  according to Lenehan; Bloom fancies  that  he  is  a bawd in the Bella Cohen's whorehouse; Bloom is  undoubtedly a cuck‑ old.  Stephen talks about Bloom unconsciously in talking about Shake speare.  In the Clohissey's bookshop

, 

Stephen asks himself  casually: 

VVho has passed here before me γ, (p. 312)  and does not know the  answer.  Readers know that it  is  very Bloom that passed the Clohis‑ sey's just before Stephen.  VV.  Y. Tindall is  so careful that he finds  a very interesting fact: 

Nor do Stephen and Bloom meet each other.  But

, 

pausing 

(7)

92  The Relationship btweenBloom and Stphen

before displays of books

, 

each  is  concerned  with  literature

, 

Bloom with pseudo‑Aristotle

, 

Stephen's area

, 

and Stephen with  pseudo‑Moses

, 

that of Bloom6•

The remarkable correspondences between Bloom and Stephen can be  found here and there.  Stephen dreams in  the Library: 

1n a rosery  of  Fetter  Lane of  Gerard

, 

herbalist

, 

he walks

, 

greyedauburn.  An azured harebell  like  her  veins.  Lids  of  Juno's eyes

, 

violets.  He walks.  One life  is  al l. One body. 

Do. But do.  (p.  259) 

1n the Ormond bar

, 

Bloom dreams as  well: In  Gerard's  rosery  of  Fetter lane he walks

, 

greyedauburn.  One life  is  al l. One body.  Do. 

But do."  (p.  362)  1t  is  a coincidence that Bloom and Stephen dream  the same dream in  the different  scenes.  Stephen thinks : We walk  through ourselves

, 

meeting robbers

, 

ghosts

, 

giants

, 

old  men

, 

young  men

, 

wives

, 

widows

, 

brothers‑in‑love.  But always meeting ourselves." 

(p.  273)  This  thought  also  corresponds  to  that of  Bloom: Think  you're escaping and run into yourself." (p. 492)  In the cabman's shel‑ ter

, 

Parnell is  brought into conversation by customers.  Bloom sees  Stephen 1ike the distinguished personage under discussion " (p.  755)  and it  is  true that Stephen identifies  himself with Parnell in A Por‑ trait.  Besides

, 

there is  some point at which Bloom himself and Par‑ nell  meet on common ground.  Bloom thinks :. • • she[Parnell's loveJ  also was Spanish or half so

, 

types that wouldn't do things by halves

, 

passionate abandon of the south

, 

casting every  shred  of  decency  to  the winds."  (p.  757)  Bloom's wife is  the same type of woman.  Bloom  could identify himself with Parnell on this  point. 

(8)

The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen  93  There wi11 be found many examples of the correspondences between  Bloom and Stephen.  They hardly meet each other until they come to  the maternity hospital.  Sti1l,  there are many proofs that explain the  fatal  relationship between them.  Moreover

, 

Bloom does  not  have  a  son now

, 

which is  the very poignant regret for  him.  The fatherless  son, Stephen, and the sonless  father, Bloom‑they seem to unite easi‑ ly.  At least

, 

the arrangements for  the touching  scene  of  their  rec‑ ognizing each other are complete

, 

before they know it.  1t  is  not too  much to  say that Bloom and Stephen are destined to  have  a father‑ son relationship

, 

whether they like  it  or not. 

If Bloom and Stephen  really  have  a father‑son  relationship

, 

what  can they do for  each other?  1t  is  a significant problem to  solve  in  order to clarify the characteristics of Bloom and Stephen. 

1n comparison with Stephen

, 

Bloom proves  to  be  quite  free  from  both the past and the future.  Stephen is  unable to discard the past :  he su任'ersfrom the death of his  mother and his own failure in Paris.  Stephen does not ¥‑"ish  he had prayed for  the dying mother

, 

even be‑ ing untrue to  his  creed.  He knows that  there was nothing  for  him  but to  reject his  mother's hope.  Sti11,  Stephen becomes the  prey  of  Agenbite of inwit.'  His agony reaches the climax at the Bella Cohen's  whorehouse.  He says to  the i11usion  of  his  mothr: They said  1  ki11ed you, mother.  He (MulliganJ offended your memory.  Cancer did  it

, 

not 1.  Destiny."  (p.  681)  Stephen is  always haunted by the fear‑ ful  memory of his  dead mother.  Stephen, who started for Paris with  great energy to  become a true artist

, 

comes back to  Dublin with  no 

(9)

94  The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen 

fruit.  In the Library

, 

even when Stephen has a controversy with John  Eglinton

, 

A. E.  and so on about Shakespeare with so superior  air  as  used to  be

, 

the unfavorable memory flashes  across Stephen's  mind: 

Fabulous arti五cer

the hawklike man.  You flew.  Whereto? 

Newhaven‑Dieppe

, 

steerage passenger.  Paris and back.  Lapwing.  Icarus. Pater

, 

ait.  Seabedabbled

, 

fallen

, 

weltering.  Lapwing you are.  Lapwing he.  (p 270)

Stephen is  a servant of  the past.  He lives  in  the past

, 

not the pres‑ ent.  Though he should say to  the past  bravely

1 am and 1 live

, '  

he is  obliged to  say imploringly,Let me be and let me live." (p. 11)  Bloom

, 

as well as Stephen

, 

has some sad memories of the past.  One  of them is  that his  father ki1led himself.  While  taking  a stroll  on  the morning

, 

Bloom recollects  the memory: Poor papa!  Poor man! 

I'm glad 1 didn't go into the room to  look at  his  face.  That day! 0  dear! 0 dear !" (p.  93)  He is  sure to suffer from the memory, which  is  also seen in his  stimannerswhen suicide comes up in conversa tion of  the fellow passengers  in  the  carriage  for  Dignam's  funeral.  He thinks  then: They have no mercy on that  (suicideJ  here or  in‑ fanticide.  Refuse christian  burial.  They used  to  drive  a stake  of  wood through his heart in the grave.  As if it  wasn't broken already. " 

(p.  120)  However

, 

it  should be remarked that Bloom does not prolong  the gloomy mood caused by the sad memory.  The past  Is  none  the  less  serious  for Bloom because he switches easily from it.  It  is  his  maturity that prevents him from sticking to the pastBloom says to  himself about the suicide of his  father: Ffoo!  Well

, 

perhaps it  was  the  b t for  him."  (p.  93)  It  is  another  sad  memory for  Bloom 

(10)

Th Relationshipbetween Bloom and Stephen  95  that his  son died young.  The beautifu1  songs  sung  in  the  Ormond  bar make B100m very sentimental.  He falls  into  a trance: Taking  my motives he twined and turned them.... All  10st  now.  Mournfu1  he whistled.  Fall

, 

surrender

, 

10st. . . . 1 know it  we11." (p. 351) B100m  thinks back to  his  own son who is  10st  now: All  gone.  All  fal1en. 

. . 1 too

, 

1ast  my race.  Milly  young  stlident.  Well

, 

my fau1t  per‑ haps.  No son.  Rudy.  Too 1ate now." (p.  367)  However

, 

B100m  re‑ covers himself by giving up steeping himself in  the para1yzed atmo‑

sphere.  He 1eaves  the Ormond bar saying to himseif

Glad I avoid‑ ed,"  (p.  370)  and cuts 0thesentimenta1 mood by the prosaic act of  breaking wind.  Besides

, 

as  discussed in detai1 1ater

, 

B100m begins to  see his  10st  son in Stephen.  Though deprived of his  father and son

, 

B100m can find both of  them by regarding  Stephen  as  his  son  and  himself the father of Stephen. 

B100m does not indu1ge in  vain regrets

, 

nor  does  he  think  fondly  of bygone happy days.  Since he knows that he shou1d not 1ive in the  past but in the present

, 

he is  not going to become a slave to the past.  He exercises his  will  to  see the pas t as  i t is  and to  make no bones  about it  any more.  He thinks: I was happier then.  Or was that I? 

Or am 1 now I? . . . Would you go back  to  then?.. Useless  to  go  back.  Had to be."  (pp.  213‑214) 

Stephen suffers from not only the past but also the future.  He has  recognized clearly that he should become an artist

, 

but he  does  not  know how to become it.  Though he is  pregnant with quite advanced  aesthetics

, 

he does not know how to give birth to it.  In the Library

, 

Stephen feels 1ike this: 

(11)

96  The Relationship betwe叩Bloomand Stephen 

Conedthoughts around me

, 

in  mummycases

, 

embalmed in  spice of words. . . . 

They are  still.  Once quick  in the brains  of  men.  Still :  but an itch of  death is  in them

, 

to  tell  me in my ear a maud

lin  tale

, 

urge me to wreak their will.  (p.  248) 

Still

, 

Stephen cannot yet wreak the will  of conedthoughts

, 

because  he conshimself in  a dilemma.  Stephen  is  too  frustrated  to  con‑ gratulate himself openly when other men force an ideal五gureon him. 

For example, when Haines says,After all, 1 should  think  you are  able to  free youself.  You are your own master, it seems to me," (p.  24)  Stephen answers that he is  not  a master  but  a servant.  When  Mr Deasy says,1 foresee. . . that  you wi11 not remain here very long  at  this  work.  You were not born to be a teacher

, 

1 think

, "  

(p.  43)  Stephen answers cynically,A learner  rather...."  (p.  43)  Stephen  is  in a state of  fret  now because his  future is  too indefInite and be

cause he depends on such inde五nitefuture too  much. 

Unlike Stephen

, 

Bloom is  not worried about the future.  He dreams  that he will bring up Stephen to a fIne  tenor, but  this  dream does  not last  long in his  thought.  After seeing  Stephen  off  at  midnight

, 

B100m plans to  build  Bloom cottage.  Saint  Leopold's.  Flowerville

, "  

(p.  841)  and to become a "gentleman farmer of fIeld produce and live  stock." (p.  842)  Bloom has various schemes of wider scope such as 

A scheme for  the development of Irish tourist  tracin  and  around Dublin by means of petrolpropelled riverboats

, 

plying  in  the fluvial  fairway  between Island  bridge  and Ringsend

, 

charabancs

, 

narrow gauge local  railways

, 

and pleasure steam ers  for  coastwise navigation (10j‑per person per  day

, 

guide 

(12)

The Relationship between Bloom and. Stphen 97  (trilingual)  includedJ.  (p.  846) 

Nevertheless

, 

Bloom does not stick to  these  schemes:  he is  not  op‑ pressed by them.  He pictures his  future to  himself in order to五nd his  mind at  peace. 

For what reason did he meditate on schemes so dicultof  realisation? 

It was one of his  axioms  that  similar  meditations  or  the  automatic relation to himself of a narrative  concerning  him‑

self  or  tranquil recollection of the past when  practised  ha‑ bitually  before  retiring  for  the  night  alleviated  fatigue  and produced as a result  sound repose and renovated vitality.  (p. 848) 

Bloom is  not at  the mercy of the past and the  future.  How to  Iive  now is  the most important concern for Bloom.  Bloom, who is  an ad‑ vertisement agent for  the Freeman

, 

is  a free  man from the past and  the future.  He is  a master of them. 

History‑especially its  continuity‑is a matter of concern for  both  Stephen and Bloom.  On the  one  hand

, 

Stephen's  concern  is  shown  well through the stream of his consciousness for instance in the third  episode like  this : The cords of all  link back

, 

strandentwining cable  of all  sesh," (p.  46) ; VVhen one reads these strange pages  of  one  long gone one feels  that one is  at  one with one who once. . 

ぺ .

p.50) ; 

Famine

, 

plague and slaughters.  Their blood  is  in  me

, 

their  Iusts  my waves."  (p.  56)  Stephen thinks  that  no  man exists  with  entire  individuality in the process of history: every man has  something  to  do with what has existed before him and what will  exist  after  him. 

(13)

98  The Relationship betwεen Bloom and 3tphen

Since Stephen wants to hold an unshakable belief in his own individ‑ uality as  an artist

, 

he abhors  and  fears  the  continuity.  In  the  Li‑ brary

, 

Stephen talks  about the relationship  between  a father  and a  son taking Shakespeare's case as an example.  Stephen denies the re‑ lationship.  According to him

, 

a father should  hate  his  son because  The images of other  males of his  blood will  repel him.  He will see  in  them grotesque attempts of natur toforetell or  repeat  himself." 

(pp. 250~251) At  the  same  time, Stephen  sys that  a son hates a  father: A father

, 

Stephen  said

, 

battling  against hopelessness

, 

i3  a  necessryevil." (pp. 265~266)

On the other hand

, 

Bloom often  thinks  about  history

, 

too: The  year returns.  History repeats itself." (p.491)  Bloom sometimes feels  vanity of human life  in  the long history: 

Things go on same; day after day: . . . One born  every  sec‑ ond somewhere.  Other dying every second. . . . Cityful  pass‑ ing away

, 

other cityful  coming

, 

passing away too: other com

ing on, passing on. . . . No one is  anything.  (p.  208) 

As an amateur astronomer

, 

Bloom meditates upon the fact  that  the  years

, 

threescore and ten

, 

of allotted human life formed a parenthesis  of in五nitesimalbrevity

, "  

(p.  819)  in comparison with  the  parallactic  drift of五xedstars.  However

, 

Bloom accepts the continuity of history  ultimately.  Bloom looks  upon life  and fears  death.  For death means  the destruction of continuity.  The idea  Metempsychosis ' often fl.ash‑ es across his  mind all  day long.  He understands this idea quite well  and explains  it  to  his wife as  follows: 

Some people believe. . . that we go on living in another  body 

(14)

The Relationship betwenBloom and Stephen 

after  death

, 

that we lived before.  They call it  reincarnation.  That we all  lived before on the earth thousands of years ago  or  some other planet.  (p.  78) 

99 

1n the funeral

, 

Bioom also thinks  that death does not put a period to  life  but rthergives new life. 1n the midst of death warein life.  Both ends met." (p.  136) ; 1t's the blood sinking in the earth gives  new life."  (p.  137)  The following opinion of S. L. Goldberg  is  very  interesting: The五rstfact we learn about him (BloomJ is  his liking  for the inner organs of beasts and fowls : . . . Bloom accepts death eas‑ ily  and transforms  it  into  life."7  Bloom feeds  the  poor  gulls  with  cakes on O'Connell  bridge; he works for  the  insurance  of  the  late  Dignam's for  his  bereaved  family;  he  inquires  after  Mrs Purefoy

, 

who has a dicultdelivery.  These deeds of Bloom testify to the fact  that  Bloom has  much sympathy  toward  the weak and  respects  life  very much.  Vvhen Bloom sees  an unknown old  woman on  a street  corner

Grey horror seared his flesh." (p. 73)  For he feels  like this : 

Now it  could bear no more.  Dead: an old woman's: the grey sunken  cunt of  the wor1d."  (p.  73)  Bloom tends to  believe that  men are im‑ mortal as  far as  they continue one after another.  1t is  because Bloom  hopes to  continue his  own life  that  he wants  a son.  Stephen  says  that  a son  sets  up against  his  father: He (SonJ  is  a male:  his  growth is  his  father's  decline, his  youth his  fathr'senvy, his friend  his father's enemy." (p.267)  Bloom does not think as Stephen.  Bloom  regards a son as  something new to hope for." (p. 128)  For him

, 

the  life  of a 80n is  the resuscitation of his  father, while  for  Stephen  it  is  the dethof  his  father. 

It i8  the irresistible power of the divine  providence  that  Stephen 

(15)

100  The Relationship between Bloom and Stephn

五ndsin history.  The greater he sees the providence to be

, 

the small‑ er he is  ob1iged to  see himself  to  be.  Hence his  agony.  Ironically  enough

, 

Stephen teaches history in  a private  school  at  Dalkey.  He  cannot give  his  students  proper  guidance;  the  students  sometimes  make a plaything of what Stephen says.  Stephen is  apt  to  be sunk  in  his  thought of history: 

Had Pyrrhus  not  fallen  by a beldam's  hand in  Argos or  Ju1ius Caesar not been knifed to death?  They are not to be  thought away.  Tii:ne has branded them and fettered they are  lodged in  the room of the infinite  possibilities  thεy have ou

ted.  But can those have been possible seeing  thatthey nev‑

er were?  Or was that  only  possible  which  came to  pass? 

Weave, weaver of the wind.  (p.  30) 

History seems to  Stephen to be not a pile of chance occurrences  but  product of inevitabilities.  He is  much afraid to feel some mighty will  behind a series of human activities.  Walking along the Sandymount

, 

Stephen shuts his  eyes for  a while and then  opens  them again  gin‑ gerly: There all  the  time  without  you:  and ever shall  be, world  without end."  (p.  46)  Stephen becomes  disappointed.  In  the  Bella  Cohen's whorehouse

, 

Stephen says to  himself abruptly: 

What went forth to  the ends of the world to  traverse not it‑ self.  God

, 

the sun

, 

Shakespeare

, 

a commercial traveller

, 

hav‑

ing itself  traversed in  reality  itself

, 

becomes  that  self..  Self which it  itself was ineluctably preconditioned to become. 

Ecco! (p. 623) 

He knows quite well that he must walk in  rea1ity in order to become 

(16)

The Relationship between Bloom and Stphen 101  himself.  What keeps Stephen from carrying out 50 is  the  fear  that  the self attained then is  ineluctab1y preconditioned by the providence  rather than by the will of himself.  Stephen

, 

who is  eager to  have a  firm be1ief in his own independence as  an artist

, 

has a horror of the  transcendenta1 design of  the providence. 

B100m very often uses the words such as  'destiny,' fate' and  kis‑ met.'  Even meeting Stephen is  a kind of destiny for Bloom: What  am 1 following him (Stephen]  for?  Still

, 

he's  the  best  of  that  10t.  If 1 hadn't heard about Mrs Beaufoy Purefoy 1 wou1dn't  have  gone  and wouldn't have met.  Kismet."  (p. 579)  Bloom as well as Stephen  is  conscious  that  there  is  a mysterious  design  behind  everything. 

However

, 

un1ike Stephen

, 

B100m does not fee1  uneasy about it.  Whi1e  he is  reversing  some  inverted  books  in  his  house at  midnight

, 

he  thinks of  The necessity of order, a p1ace for everything and every‑

thing in its  p1ace:. . .."  (p.  834) Bloom thinks that everything shou1d  be p1aced in the abso1ute order.  He says to Stephen in the cabman's  shelter: Everybody gets  their own ration of 1uck

, 

they  say.... Ev‑

eryone according to  his needs and eγeryone according to  his  deeds." 

(p.  713)  B100m thinks human beings none the 1ess fortunate because  they be10ng to  the irresistib1e order and get on1y what is  allotted to  them.  He knows it  necessary to  content himself with what is  given  to him.  The idea of  the  divine  providence  1eads  Stephen  to  pessi‑ mistic fata1ism; Stephen is  too battered by the idea to  make a move  as a man.  On the other hand, Bloom can accept the idea  of  the  di‑ vine providence easi1y; the idea  does  not  tie  his  hands.  Whatever  the divine providence may be, B100m goes his own way. 

S. L. Goldberg says: 

(17)

102  The Rlationshipbetween Bloom and Stphen

The virtue of Bloom is  that he never realIy succumbs to the  nightmare of what his  depressing history  (that  of  his  race

, 

his  society, or his  own) would make him.  He emerges  from  his trials and temptations clearly enough for us to understand

, 

even if  he cannot

, 

the nature of his  superiority to  Stephen. As far  as  Stephen adheres too closely to  the past and the future

, 

to  history or  to  the divine providence

, 

Stephen cannot live  in  the pres‑ ent  nor  produce  anything  fruitfu .I Stephen  should  learn  the  way  Bloom lives  in the present and Bloom should guide Stephen the path  of righteousness as a father. 

Then

, 

in  fact

, 

how do Bloom and Stephen  meet  in Ulysses?  How  does Bloom have  relation  to  Stephen?  At五rst

Bloom is  conscious  of Stephen as  no more than a son of Simon Dedalus.  In  catching  a  glimpse of Stephen

, 

Bloom says to  Simon

There's a friend is  yours  gone by. . . . Your son and heir." (p.  109)  In the Evening  Telegraph  oce,Bloom observes Stephen as an unrelated person: 

Nonderis  that young Dedalus the moving spirit.  Has a good  pair of boots on him today.  Last time 1 saw him he had his  heels on view.  Been walking in  much somewhere.  Careless  chap.  What was he doing in Irishtown? (p.  186) 

Bloom does not yet feel strong affinities with Stephen.  In the Ormond  bar, Bloom hits  upon Stephen by accident when he remembers  meet‑

ing M uIligan in  the Museum.  Yet

, 

Stephen remains  Dedalus' son  (p.  334)  for  Bloom.  1t  Is  true  that  Bloom does  not  pay  special  at‑

(18)

The Rlationshipbetween Bloom and Stephen  103  tention to  Stephen here

, 

but he begins  to  miss  his  dead  son  Rudy  very much.  There is  a sign of Bloom's identification of his  lost  son  with Stephen

, 

even if B100m does not yet notice it. 

It  is  in  the maternity hospital that Bloom really begins to  see  his  son in Stephen.  He displays a fatherly  interest  in  Stephen  who is  leading a loose life. 

. . . now sir  Leopold that had of  his  body no manchild for an  heir looked upon him his  friend's  son and was shut up in sor‑ row for  his  forepassed happiness and as  sad as  he was  that  him failed  a son of  such  gentle  courage  (for  al1  accounted  him of  real  parts)  so grieved he also in  no less  measure for  young Stephen for  that he lived riotously with those wastrels  and murdered his goods with whores.  (p.  510) 

The more attentively Bloom watches Stephen

, 

the  more  strongly  he  feels  that he should not leave Stephen alone  in  the  lawless  fel1ows. 

It is  in  the Bella Cohen's wicked whorehouse

, 

where Bloom comes  to  watch over  Stephen

, 

that  Bloom speaks  to  Stephen with a fatherly  care for  the五rsttime: 

(.  . . Bloom goes with the ρoundnote to  Stephen.)  BLOOM: This is  yours. 

STEPHEN: How is  that?  Le distrait  or  absentminded  beg‑

gar.  (He fumbles again in  his pocket and draws out  a hαnd‑ ful of coins.  An object falls.)  That fell. 

BLOOM: (Stooping

, 

picks uραnd hands a box of matches)  This. 

STEPHEN: Lucifer.  Thanks. 

BLOOM: (Quietly)  You had better  hand over  that  cash  to 

(19)

104  The Relationship btweenBloom and Stephen  me to  tak careof.  Why pay more? 

STEPHEN; (Hands him all his  coins)  Be just before you are  generous. 

BLOOM: 1 wilI  but is  it  wise?  (pp. 665‑666) 

A box of matches is  handed to Stephen by Bloom

, 

which indicates that  the match between Bloom and Stephen is  offered  by Bloom.  When  Stephen is  knocked down by Private  Carr, Bloom helps  Stephen  up  saying desperately: 

BLOOM: Eh!  Ho! (There is  no answer; he bends again) Mr  Dedalus! (There is  no answer) The name  if  you  cal .ISom‑

nambu1ist. (He bends again and

, 

hesitating

, 

brings his mouth  near the face of the prostrate  form)  Stephen!  (There  is  no  answer.  He calls  again.)  Stephen!  (p.  701) 

It is  the fIrst  time that Bloom caIls Stephen by his五rst name.  For  Bloom

, 

this  young man is  no longer  young Dedalus'  nor  Dedalus'  son.  While looking down on Stephen's face and form

, 

Bloom sees the  i1Iusion of a changeling

, 

which proves  to  be Rudy.  Bloom becomes  the father of Stephen now entirely by identifying Stephen with Rudy. 

If Stephen regarded Bloom as his  father

, 

the father‑son relationship  between Bloom and Stephen might  be completed.  However

, 

Stephen  never turns his  attention to  Bloom; he regards Bloom as an insigniι  cant person.  In the BelIa Cohen's  whorehouse, though Bloom hands  a box of  matches to  Stephen, Stephen cannot utilize  it. 

STEPHEN: (Comes to  the table)  Cigarette

, 

please. . . .  (He strikes a match and proceeds to  light  the  cigarette  with  enigmatic melancholy) 

(20)

The Relationship betwenBloom and Stphen 105  LYNCH: (Watching him)  You would have  a better  chanc

of lighting it  if  you held the match nearer. 

STEPHEN: (Bringsthe match nearer his eye)  Lynx eye.  Must  get glasses. Broke thεm yesterday. Sixteen yarsago. Distance.  The eye sees  all  flat. (He  draws  the  match  away.  It  goes  out.)  (p. 666) 

Lynch's above words are meaningful: they can be read in such a way  as  Stephen would h'lve a better chance of  lighting his  genius if  he  held the match offered by Bloom nearer.'  As a matter of fact

, 

Stephen  cannot light  the cigarette with the match

, 

which is  drawn away and  extinguished.  The match

, 

which is  a symbol of  the  father‑son  rela tionship between Bloom and Stephen

, 

is  not put  to  practical  use  by  Stephen.  Stephen is  always indifferent  to Bloom and never feels sym‑

pathy toward him.  Though Bloom helps  Stephen out  of  the  violent  confusion in  the五ftenthepisode

, 

Stephen will not thank Bloom: 

Most of al1  he (BloomJ commented adversely on the desertion  of Stephen by all  his  pubhunting confreres  but  one

, 

a most  glaring piece of  ratting on the part  of  his  brother  medicos  under all  the circs. 

‑And that one was Judas

, 

said  Stephen

, 

who up to  then  had said nothing whatsoever of any kind.  (p.  707) 

Stephen  does  not  distinguish  Bloom  from other  Dubliners  who he  thinks are al1  betrayers.  In the  cabman's  shelter

, 

Stephen  regards  Bloom only as  some unknown listener somewhere" (p. 737) and sees 

a strange kind of flesh  of  a different  man (BloomJ  approach  him

, 

sinewless and wobbly and al1  that." (p.  769)  Even in  the  house  of 

(21)

106  The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen 

B1oom

, 

Stephen bewilders him by singing the strange anti‑Semitic leg

end.  Though Stephen may seem to be quite obedient to Bloom in the  cabman's shelter and in B1oom's house

, 

it  is  not because Stephen re‑ spects B100m but because Stephen is  too tired  from drinking  much. 

Stephen does not see his  father in B1oom. 

S. L. Goldberg says: 

Between the PortraitndUlysses, Stephen has come to  real‑ ize  (as  was already foreshadowed in Stephen Hero)  that  for  the highest artistic achievements the  artistic temperament,'  with its  kinetic reactions  to  the world

, 

is  a handicap.  As he  put it in StejhenHero

, 

great art can spring only  from  the  classical  temper,'  the  'most  stable  mood of  the  mind.'  1n  Ulysses

, 

it is  Bloom

, 

once a 'kinetic poet' himself

, 

who now  represents the  scientific temperament '‑a s tabili ty

, 

a detach‑ ment

, 

an engagement with the external world‑that  Stephen

, 

for  all  his  knowledge  and potential  imagination

, 

has yet  to  achieve.

Stephen  would find  how to become a true  artist  if  he attended  to  B1oom.  However, he does not realize that it  is B100m who holds  the  key to  the solution of Stephen's question.  J¥10reover

, 

it  must be ob‑ served that Bloom does not recognize what he can really  do for  Ste‑ phen.  Since B100m has a lot  of  significant  teachings  about  how to  live

, 

he could satisfy Stephen's wants if  only  he  intended.  Yet

, 

he  cannot understand what is  necessary for  Stephen. 

His  (Bloom'sJ  initial  impression was that  he  (StephenJ  was  a bit standoshor not over effusive but it  grew on him some‑

way.  For one thing he mightn't what you call  jump at  the 

(22)

The Relationship between Bloom and Stephen  107  idea

, 

if  approached

, 

and what mostly worried him was he did n't  know how to  lead up to it  or word it  exactly

, 

supposing  he did entertain  the  proposal

, 

as  it  would  afford  him very  great personal pleasure if  he would allow him to help to put  coin in his  way or some wardrobe

, 

if  found suitable.  (p. 765) 

Stephen needs mature advice of  Bloom  rather  than  a coin  or  some  wardrobe in  order to  live  freely.  Bloom does not know what Stphen really needs and what Bloom should do for  him.  Thus

, 

Bloom is nev‑

er prsuasiveand influential  on Stephen. 

The father‑son relationship is  desirable for both Bloom and Stephen. 

If it  were completed, Bloom would be hppyto have the heir who will  succeed to  the existence of Bloom

, 

and Stephen would be also  happy  to have the father who will  lead him to  his  purpose.  However

, 

this  relationship  remains incomplete. 

NOTES 

1  ]. 1. M. Stewart, James  Joyce (Writers  and  Their  Work: No. 91" ;  London: Longmans, Green Co. Ltd., 1957), p.  18. 

2  Anthony Cronin, A Question 01 Modernity (London: Secker Warburg,  c 1966), p.  71. 

3  Joyce made two schemata of  Ulysses, one  of  which was sent to  Carlo  Linati in September 1920.  1t  is  the table of colours, techniques, organs,  Homeric parallels and other aspects of  Ulysses. 

4  Richard1.Kain reviews  several  positions  of  the  comment  on what  happens in  Ulysses and  whether  the  meeting of Bloom and  Stephen is  :  significant.  The following list  is  Kain's as it  is, and the names of critics  who assert each view are given in  parentheses after each item according  to  Kain's explanation: 

1.  Isolation;  the meeting is  fortuitous and unimportant, a demonstra‑ tion of  modern keylessness or of the existential position of man.  (S. 

(23)

108  The Relationship between Bloom and !":tephen  Gilbert, F.  Budgen, H. Levin, H. Kenner) 

2.  Creativity: Stephen becornes a discoverer of rnankind, through corn.  rnunion with Bloorn.  (E. Wilson, W. Y. Tindall) 

3.  Arnbiguity: Joyce's  rnode  of  contrasting  syrnbols and his  penchant  toward anticlirnax  render any single theory suspect.  (S. F. Darnon)  4.  Trinitarian: Joyce seerns  to  indicate a subtle relationship of hirnself, 

Stephen, and Bloorn.  (].  Prescott) 

5.  Classical Ternper:  the  book reveals  the wholeness  and  cornplexity  of life.  (S. L. Goldberg) 

6.  Existential: Bloorn and Stephen reach a point of crisis, the outcorne  of  which is  problernatic.  (W. T. Noon, A. Goldrnan, E.  Epstein)  7.  Biographical Fact: Ulysses drarnatizes a crucial personal experience 

of the author.  (W. Ernpson) 

8.  Psychological Projection: Stephen and Bloorn arectionalsurrogates  for Joyce's own conscious and subconscious drives.  (].  Gross)  (Richard M. KainThe  signicance of  Stephen's  Meeting  Bloorn:  A  Survey of Interpretations," James Joyce Quarterly CNovernber 1, 1972J, p.  159.) 

5  Jarnes Joyce, Ulysses (London: The Bodley Head, 1960), p. 109.  Unless  otherwise stated, all  subsequent references to the novel will be frorn this  edition and page nurnbers will be indicated in  rny  text. 

6  Williarn York Tindall, A Readers's  Guide to  James  Joyce (New York: 

The Noonday Press, 1959), p.  181. 

7  S. L. Goldberg, The Classical Temper: A Study 0/ James Joyce' sUlysses'  (London: Chatto and Windus, 1961), p.  171. 

8  Ibid., p.  186.  9  Ibid., p. 97. 

Updating...

参照

Updating...

関連した話題 :

Scan and read on 1LIB APP